Why You Should Stop Chewing Tobacco For Dental Health

For many people, chewing tobacco has become an integral part of the culture similar to following the national anthem. However, though these people may think that they attain a cool persona for chewing tobacco, perhaps what they do not know is the tremendous health threats that the tobacco hides.

These threats may be as severe as death and disfigurement. But what perhaps many do not know is that chewing tobacco may also give rise to problems related to gums, mouth, and teeth.

 

Do you need some more reasons for quitting the habit? Check out some of them below.

Teeth staining and bad breath

One of the key reasons of bad breath is none other than chewing tobacco. ?Moreover, it can stain your teeth too and thus leave your smile dingy, unattractive, as well as, dull. Not only that, when your smile becomes unattractive, your self-confidence can suffer and also affect your social relationships in an adverse manner.

Adverse effects caused by nicotine

One of the most active ingredients in all tobacco is the presence of nicotine in it. Nicotine can get absorbed in the tissues of your mouth and lead to a decrease in the blood flowing to them. The reduction in blood flow may restrict the flow of antibodies in those portions in your mouth where there is an infection.

Higher vulnerability to dental diseases

Gum disease, as well as, tooth decay can both pop up mainly from the bacterial plaque that gets deposited on the surface of the tooth. When you use tobacco in any form, the chances of developing these dental diseases go up and treatments become tougher. To know more, pay a visit to your dentist in Cary.

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Why is Good Nutrition a Must For Dental Health?

It is important to include proper nutrients and minerals in your daily diet so that the tissues in your body can resist infection.

If any nutrient is present too little or in excess, it can lead to harmful effects on your teeth and mouth. It can even lead to oral infections and diseases. A vital aspect of having good oral hygiene and healthy teeth is to eat the right kind of food.

Avoiding drinks and snacks with high proportions of sugar and eating healthy food are great ways to prevent cavities. But selecting a healthy diet may be more difficult than you realize.

For instance, you all are aware that fresh vegetables and fruits are good for your overall and dental health. ?But even these foods have natural sugars in them and that can damage your teeth.

Though your saliva can help in neutralizing some of the damaging acidic effects of the edibles, yet good dental hygiene can protect the natural defenses in your body for a long time. Using clean water to rinse your mouth after your meal is no use if you don?t brush your teeth well.

Moreover, you need to supplement your daily diet with minerals and vitamins. This can make a significant difference to your dental health.

Vitamin D and calcium are very important for healthy teeth. Adequate calcium is necessary for your teeth?s structure. Even minerals like magnesium and phosphorus are good for your oral hygiene.

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How to Avoid Cavities in Kids

Dentists across the region, in Durham, Chapel Hill, and Duke all strongly urge parents to start caring for their children?s dental health with the same attention they devote to their general physical fitness in the early years.

Here are a few quick tips from family dental centers in the area, to help you prevent the bane of every parent- cavities.

Get your child into the habit of brushing and flossing from when they are young. Help them until they are about 5 or 6 years, with the brushing and until about age 9 or 10 for flossing. After that, the Chapel Hill Dental specialists say that kids should be able to manage on their own. Use fluoride toothpaste for your kids, a teeny smear when they are under 2 and a pea sized dab after.

Set the right example- if you keep up a regular routine of brushing and flossing, so will your child. Durham Hill dentists say that kids pick-up a lot of cues from what their parents do, so your habits will likely be passed on to them.

Encourage the transition from sippy cups to regular cups. Family dental specialists say that this should be by around 12 months. Wean them off baby cups completely by 15 months.

Limit daily intake of juice to 4 to 6 oz. at most. And cut the candy if you feel your child is indulging multiple times a day. It is a nightmare for your child’s teeth and a dream setting for cavities.

Never allow them to go to bed without brushing and rinsing well. This means no bedtime bottle or sugary snacks- not even milk.

With a little care, your child should be cavity-free well into adulthood.

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